The discrimination of women in middle east and islamic views

Perhaps most upsetting is the prevalence of rape victims who are persuaded to marry their rapist. Get Free Exclusive Gatestone Content: She suggests that they lost many of their rights through ancient Greek and Roman law prior to the arrival of Islam and that these Greco-Roman constraints were retained under Islam.

She says, "The equation of anti-Semitism to anti-Zionism is systematically used as a silencing tactic.

Arab Women in the Middle East

In other places such as the city of Makkah Mecca -- where the prophet of IslamMuhammadwas born—a tribal set of rights was in place.

No part of the Gatestone website or any of its contents may be reproduced, copied or modified, without The discrimination of women in middle east and islamic views prior written consent of Gatestone Institute.

Relevant discussion may be found on the talk page. To start a sexual revolution and overthrow the patriarchy that exists in the home, streets, and minds, women must share their personal stories.

She thus concludes that the Muslim idea of monogamy being a post-Islamic idea is flawed and biased and that women had the right to contract such a marriage before Islam. But it is here that they often face the most danger. However, the Arab country with the largest parliament, Egypt, had only around four per cent female representation in parliament.

Jarmakani argues that because of the dominant representation of Arab women given by the Bush administration many individuals in western societies have an orientalist point of view, have Islamophobia and believe that Arab feminism cannot exist. Veiling has received the most attention in the West, and especially France, where it has been hotly debated.

In Tunisia, nearly 23 per cent of members of parliament were women. Although of course there is much Israel could do to improve the living standards of its Arab citizens, especially in employment and infrastructure, the success stories of Arab women in Israel stand in sharp contrast to the reports about discrimination against women in the Arab and Islamic countries.

The conflict occurring Israel and Palestine is a prime example of how these misconceptions create an incorrect understanding of the circumstances and experiences that women in this area encounter in their daily lives. But the issue of veiling in the Muslim world often overshadows the far more serious problems of harassment, rape, and domestic abuse.

She describes the "bigoted and racist Western right wing" in America as being blind to the fact that their efforts against "reproductive rights" are just as misogynistic as the abuse faced by Muslim women.

According to Islamic studies professor William Montgomery WattIslam improved the status of women by "instituting rights of property ownership, inheritance, education and divorce. This certainly gives the impression that Middle Eastern women have little or no economical role, until one notes that the statistics are based on non-agricultural labor outside the home.

Because the mythologies are so pervasive, operating subtly and insidiously on the register of "common sense," Arab American feminists are often kept oriented toward correcting these common misconceptions rather than focusing on our own agendas and concerns.

She questions how it was possible for men to have numerous women if so many females were being killed as infants. Syrian refugee girls who fled the fighting in their country are being forced into marriages by Muslim men, who are exploiting the plight of their families to fulfill sexual fantasies.

Eltahawy describes the horrifying reality in the Middle East, where rape victims are often more stigmatized than rapists, and where women can be punished as "fornicators" under the zina, the part of Islamic law that has to do with unlawful sexual intercourse.

Moghadam analyzes the situation of women from a marxist theoretical framework and argues that the position of women is mostly influenced by the extent of urbanization, industrialization, proletarization and political ploys of the state managers rather than culture or intrinsic properties of Islam; Islam, Moghadam argues, is neither more nor less patriarchal than other world religions especially Christianity and Judaism.

At the time of this writing, only Jordan, Mauritania, and Tunisia have laws that address domestic violence, although Eltahawy argues that they are rarely enforced.

In Tunisia, a young woman who was raped by three policemen is about to on trial for committing an "indecent act.

This was especially the case for learned and scholarly families, who wanted to ensure the highest possible education for both their sons and daughters. As she got older she convinced herself she was expressing her feminist right to choose the veil.The legal status of women in the modern Middle East has been in transition since the early part of the twentieth century.

Customary laws, Islamic laws, imported European laws, and reformed versions of Islamic laws affect women in" Varying degrees in the different Middle Eastern legal systems, and the status of women does not seem to.

TOWARDS GENDER EQUALITY IN THE ARAB/MIDDLE EAST REGION: ISLAM, CULTURE, AND FEMINIST ACTIVISM Valentine M. Moghadam /6. TOWARDS GENDER EQUALITY IN THE ARAB/MIDDLE EAST REGION: ISLAM, CULTURE, AND FEMINIST ACTIVISM (Prepared for HDR ; Final Version, Dec.

) the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women. Women in the Middle East Although there is no gender equality in the Middle East (including in Israel), the phenomena of sexism and misogyny are global—not peculiar to Islam, or to the Middle East.

By As’ad AbuKhalil, October 11, In Saudi Arabia, women are still not allowed to drive. In Israel, however, Muslim women are not only allowed to drive and run for elections, but can also reach high positions.

Not all Arab Israelis are an "enemy from within;" Muslim women in the Jewish state enjoy more rights and opportunities than their colleagues in Arab and Islamic countries. Nor does Eltahawy give any examples of discrimination or violence toward women by Christians or secularists in the Middle East and North Africa.

Thus, she never fully engages the question of how the predominant religion in the region, Islam, is directly involved in the oppression of women, other than its use and abuse by men.

The Hadiths in Bukhari suggest that Islam improved women's status, by the second Caliph Umar saying "We never used to give significance to ladies in the days of the Pre-Islamic period of ignorance, but when Islam came and Allah mentioned their rights, we used to give them their rights but did not allow them to interfere in our affairs", Book 77, Hadith.

The Truth About Women in the Middle East Download
The discrimination of women in middle east and islamic views
Rated 4/5 based on 81 review